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CARRIAGE HORSES
Letters & Editorials

CITY CARRIAGE HORSES THAT NEED NOT HAVE DIED

July 26, 1982

To the Editor:
 
News of the needless deaths of three of New York City's carriage horses
during the recent heat wave (news story July 20) was made more appalling
by the fact that the animals were supposedly protected under a newly
enacted law.

The horse license law was the result of citizen efforts on behalf of
animals. Its backers believed - when the widely publicized signatures had
dried - that the city would use its mandate to prevent further abuse of
the working horses. Apparently they were wrong; neither the
administration nor its health commissioner, under whose province the new
act fell, took the next essential step.

A committee of community representatives and carriage operators, which is
to draft enforcement standards, remains un-appointed after seven months,
and the act cannot be effectively enforced without standards.

New York's carriage horses deserve our attention. They are sentient
beings; they can feel pain, hunger and fatigue and know the ravages of
neglect and abuse. They are also symbols of the services our livestock
animals provide for humans.

Many urban children will never have contact with the animals that provide
food and clothing; for them the carriage horse is a rare link with the
animal kingdom. The treatment these animals receive is a lesson - for
good or bad - in the concept of stewardship and compassion for our fellow
creatures.

Prompt steps should be taken to insure that this law is swiftly readied
for enforcement. We owe immediate action to the animals, which have
suffered for our neglect, and to the children, who will learn from what
we do or fail to do.

WILLIAM T. REDDING
Executive Vice President Council for Livestock Protection, Inc.
New York, July 20, 1982

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